Occupied Neurons, September release

I’ve been scratching the itch of building an app for myself that solves a Job-to-be-done: when I’m networking, I want a tool to remind myself who are the weak ties in my network I’ve talked to, and what I’ve learned about them.  I want visual refreshers (photos I may have of them) and textual reminders of topics and things an otherwise-non-porous-memory would retain about people whose company I have previously enjoyed.

Using Firebase with ReactJS

In all the research I’m doing on prototyping a front end for my app, I’ve struggled to find something that’s more than “assemble every bespoke tag, class and id by hand” but less than “spend the next six months learning AngularJS”.  Focusing on the front-end to explore my user needs, I didn’t want to get stuck developing a big-ass (and probably unnecessary) back-end stack – even just adapting some well-defined pattern – so I started to explore Firebase [which is all front-end coding with a back-end data layer – to approximate it horribly].

And with a couple more explorations of the territory, I stumbled on the ReactJS “getting started” guide via the Hello World app, and finally understood how cool it is to have a pseudo-object-oriented approach to assembling the “V” in MVC.  (Who knows – for all I know, this is just vanilla ES6 now, and I’m just that far behind the times.)

Still, it is strikingly familiar in basic construction and with the promise of integrating a Firebase “backend” to give me a lightweight stack that will more than adequately perform for me as a single user, I’m finally willing to wade through the React Tutorial and see if that’s enough for me to piece together a working prototype

Props vs State in React

This is one of the more striking subtleties of React – how similar props and state are, and how it appears [at least to me] that the distinction is more a convention for others to understand how to use your React code, than anything that is required by the React compiler.

 

And on the Product Side of my mental tesseract…

I’ve also been refreshing my knowledge of the Product Management practices I haven’t had an opportunity to practice lately.  Amongst which:

How does a Product Manager perform competitive analysis?

This is the clearest-eyed explanation I’ve seen yet about “understanding your competition”.  I’ve worked with too many Product Marketing folks who get spun up about the checklist war, and making sure that we have feature parity in the product, and it’s always seemed like a lot of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

Focusing on “what problems does the competition solve for *YOU* dear customer, and why are those important to your core business?” is a whole lot more genuine *and* believable to me.  I’ve never thought of this line of questioning as “competitive analysis”, just part of doing my job to suss out what I can do to help my customers.

Advertisements

How Do I Know What Success Looks Like?

I was asked recently what I do to ensure my team knows what success looks like.  I generally start with a clear definition of done, then factor usage and satisfaction into my evaluation of success-via-customers.

Evaluation Schema

Having a clear idea of what “done” looks like means having crisp answers to questions like:

  • Who am I building for?
    • Building for “everyone” usually means it doesn’t work well for anyone
  • What problem is it fixing for them?
    • I normally evaluate problems-to-solve based on the new actions or decisions the user can take *with* the solution that they can’t take *without* it
  • Does this deliver more business value than other work we’re considering?
    • Delivering value we can believe in is great, and obviously we ought to have a sense that this has higher value than the competing items on our backlog

What About The Rest?

My backlog of “ideas” is a place where I often leave things to bake.  Until I have a clear picture in my mind who will benefit from this (and just as importantly, who will not), and until I can articulate how this makes the user’s life measurably better, I won’t pull an idea into the near-term roadmap let alone start breaking it down for iteration prioritization.

In my experience there are lots of great ideas people have that they’ll bring to whoever they believe is the authority for “getting shit into the product”.  Engineers, sales, customers – all have ideas they think should get done.  One time my Principal Engineer spent an hour talking me through a hyper-normalized data model enhancement for my product.  Another time, I heard loudly from many customers that they wanted us to support their use of MongoDB with a specific development platform.

I thanked them for their feedback, and I earnestly spent time thinking about the implications – how do I know there’s a clear value prop for this work?

  • Is there one specific user role/usage model that this obviously supports?
  • Would it make users’ lives demonstrably better in accomplishing their business goals & workflows with the product as they currently use it?
  • Would the engineering effort support/complement other changes that we were planning to make?
  • Was this a dealbreaker for any user/customer, and not merely an annoyance or a “that’s something we *should* do”?
  • Is this something that addresses a gap/need right now – not just “good engineering that should become useful in the future”?  (There’s lots of cool things that would be fun to work on – one time I sat through a day-long engineering wish list session – but we’re lucky if we can carve out a minor portion of the team’s capacity away from the things that will help right now.)

If I don’t get at least a flash of sweat and “heat” that this is worth pursuing (I didn’t with the examples mentioned), then these things go on the backlog and they wait.  Usually the important items will come back up, again and again.  (Sometimes the unimportant things too.)  When they resurface, I test them against product strategy, currently-prioritized (and sized) roadmap and our prioritization scoring model, and I look for evidence that shows me this new idea beats something we’re already planning on doing.

If I have a strong impression that I can say “yes” to some or all of these, then it also usually comes along with a number of assumptions I’m willing to test, and effort I’m willing to put in to articulate the results this needs to deliver [usually in a phased approach].

Delivery

At that point we switch into execution and refinement mode – while we’ve already had some roughing-out discussions with engineering and design, this is where backlog grooming hammers out the questions and unknowns that bring us to a state where (a) the delivery team is confident what they’re meant to create and (b) estimates fall within a narrow range of guesses [i.e. we’re not hearing “could take a day, could take a week” – that’s a code smell].

Along the way I’m always emphasizing what result the user wants to see – because shit happens, surprises arise, priorities shift, the delivery team needs a solid defender of the result we’re going to deliver for the customer.  That doesn’t mean don’t flex on the details, or don’t change priorities as market conditions change, but it does mean providing a consistent voice that shines through the clutter and confusion of all the details, questions and opinions that inevitably arise as the feature/enhancement/story gets closer to delivery.

It also means making sure that your “voice of the customer” is actually informed by the customer, so as you’re developing definition of Done, mockups, prototypes and alpha/beta versions, I’ve made a point of taking the opportunity where it exists to pull in a customer or three for a usability test, or a customer proxy (TSE, consultant, success advocate) to give me their feedback, reaction and thinking in response to whatever deliverables we have available.

The most important part of putting in this effort to listen, though, is learning and adapting to the feedback.  It doesn’t mean rip-sawing in response to any contrary input, but it does mean absorbing it and making sure you’re not being pig-headed about the up-front ideas you generated that are more than likely wrong in small or big ways.  One of my colleagues has articulated this as Presumptive Design, whereby your up-front presumptions are going to be wrong, and the best thing you can do is to put those ideas in front of customers, users, proxies as fast and frequently as possible to find out how wrong you are.

Evaluating Success

Up front and along the way, I develop a sense of what success will look like when it’s out there, and that usually takes the form of quantity and quality – useage of the feature, and satisfaction with the feature.  Getting instrumentation of the feature in place is a brilliant but low-fidelity way of understanding whether it was deemed useful – if numbers and ratios are high in the first week and then steadily drop off the longer folks use it, that’s a signal to investigate more deeply.  The user satisfaction side – post-hoc surveys, customer calls – to get a sense of NPS-like confidence and “recommendability” are higher-fidelity means of validating how it’s actually impacting real humans.

You Get Invited When You Add Believable Value

I’m constantly amazed and amused at this kind of “but *I* deserve to be invited too” thinking:
All too often folks don’t want to bring everyone in on Day 1.
And that’s the real problem.
They don’t want to relinquish the (illusion of) control. They want the freedom to make many of the decisions without participating in this crucial collaborative work. Well, guess what? That’s a very costly move: The later everyone is brought in the greater the overall project risk.
In my career, I’ve heard this from the Operations folks, the Support team, the Security high priests, and most recently from the UX zealots.
This usually takes the form of “but if only they’d included us too in the conversation at the beginning, we wouldn’t be in this mess” fantasy.  The longer I watch these folks argue from the sidelines [and one of the things I used to do], the less sympathy I feel.
Telling us on the development & delivery side of the organization that we need to include you too feels a little like telling a kid they have to watch all the good movies with their parents in the room.  I’m sorry, what exactly about that sounds like an incentive?
“Oh, well if you found that security flaw in architecture instead of during test, it would’ve been orders of magnitude cheaper.”  As if it’s a pure win-win scenario – and not, as reality suggests from talking to the folks actually doing the real work, that rather than *prevent* every statistical possibility, often times we’d rather get the product out in front of people and find out which things *actually* bit them/us on the butt, and only spend time fixing *those* things.  Get product out there capturing revenue months earlier, plus reduce your investment on the long tail of an infinite number of possible issues that would cost schedule and profits to fix up front (and turn out to be non-issues)?  Yeah, you don’t need an MBA to make that kind of call.
[Not to mention, “fixing something in architecture is cheaper” assumes (1) that the architecture is communicated, interpreted and implemented carefully and successfully, (2) that new bugs aren’t introduced at every translation layer because the architects abandon their responsibility to follow-through, and (3) that they anticipated and addressed every implementation issue.]
“But if you just invited the UX designers/researchers before starting to talk about product features and ideas, you’ll have a much wider palette of well-designed ideas to work from.”  Yes, that’s potentially true – if your designers have a clear idea what the target users need – or if the researchers can turn around actionable findings in a short timeframe – or your UX bigots don’t throw cold water on every speculative idea and colour the conversation with “how crappy everyone but me is”.  That dude is real fun at parties.
We love working with that guy
Are you one of these people I’m picking on?  Are you sufficiently pissed off yet?  OK, good – then we’re getting close to a defensive wound we’re all still harbouring.  Which is the right time to clarify: I absolutely appreciate working with folks who are aligned to our business priorities, and work to get us actionable results in a timely manner that are relevant to the business problem we’re facing.  I’ve spent decades now working with security and usability geeks, and some I’ve found to be extremely helpful.  Some I’ve found less so.  Guess which ones I’ve heard complain like this?
Here’s the pitch from a Product Manager to everyone who’s vying to get a seat at the table: I don’t have enough room at the table to entertain everyone’s ego.  You ever try to drive an effective decision-making body when the room (or conference bridge) is stuffed so bad, it looks like a clown car?
It's a fun ride until you can't breathe
It’s a fun ride until you can’t breathe
Those who I invite to the table are effective collaborators.  If you have a concern, make sure it’s the most important thing on your plate, make sure it’s something I can understand, and make damn sure it’s something that’s going to have an impact on our business results.  Every time you spend your precious ante on “but what if…” and not “here’s a problem and here are all the possible/feasible/useful solutions, depending on your priorities”, your invitation to the next conversation fades like Marty McFly’s family in that photo.
McFly-Erasedfromexistance