How Do I Know What Success Looks Like?

I was asked recently what I do to ensure my team knows what success looks like.  I generally start with a clear definition of done, then factor usage and satisfaction into my evaluation of success-via-customers.

Evaluation Schema

Having a clear idea of what “done” looks like means having crisp answers to questions like:

  • Who am I building for?
    • Building for “everyone” usually means it doesn’t work well for anyone
  • What problem is it fixing for them?
    • I normally evaluate problems-to-solve based on the new actions or decisions the user can take *with* the solution that they can’t take *without* it
  • Does this deliver more business value than other work we’re considering?
    • Delivering value we can believe in is great, and obviously we ought to have a sense that this has higher value than the competing items on our backlog

What About The Rest?

My backlog of “ideas” is a place where I often leave things to bake.  Until I have a clear picture in my mind who will benefit from this (and just as importantly, who will not), and until I can articulate how this makes the user’s life measurably better, I won’t pull an idea into the near-term roadmap let alone start breaking it down for iteration prioritization.

In my experience there are lots of great ideas people have that they’ll bring to whoever they believe is the authority for “getting shit into the product”.  Engineers, sales, customers – all have ideas they think should get done.  One time my Principal Engineer spent an hour talking me through a hyper-normalized data model enhancement for my product.  Another time, I heard loudly from many customers that they wanted us to support their use of MongoDB with a specific development platform.

I thanked them for their feedback, and I earnestly spent time thinking about the implications – how do I know there’s a clear value prop for this work?

  • Is there one specific user role/usage model that this obviously supports?
  • Would it make users’ lives demonstrably better in accomplishing their business goals & workflows with the product as they currently use it?
  • Would the engineering effort support/complement other changes that we were planning to make?
  • Was this a dealbreaker for any user/customer, and not merely an annoyance or a “that’s something we *should* do”?
  • Is this something that addresses a gap/need right now – not just “good engineering that should become useful in the future”?  (There’s lots of cool things that would be fun to work on – one time I sat through a day-long engineering wish list session – but we’re lucky if we can carve out a minor portion of the team’s capacity away from the things that will help right now.)

If I don’t get at least a flash of sweat and “heat” that this is worth pursuing (I didn’t with the examples mentioned), then these things go on the backlog and they wait.  Usually the important items will come back up, again and again.  (Sometimes the unimportant things too.)  When they resurface, I test them against product strategy, currently-prioritized (and sized) roadmap and our prioritization scoring model, and I look for evidence that shows me this new idea beats something we’re already planning on doing.

If I have a strong impression that I can say “yes” to some or all of these, then it also usually comes along with a number of assumptions I’m willing to test, and effort I’m willing to put in to articulate the results this needs to deliver [usually in a phased approach].

Delivery

At that point we switch into execution and refinement mode – while we’ve already had some roughing-out discussions with engineering and design, this is where backlog grooming hammers out the questions and unknowns that bring us to a state where (a) the delivery team is confident what they’re meant to create and (b) estimates fall within a narrow range of guesses [i.e. we’re not hearing “could take a day, could take a week” – that’s a code smell].

Along the way I’m always emphasizing what result the user wants to see – because shit happens, surprises arise, priorities shift, the delivery team needs a solid defender of the result we’re going to deliver for the customer.  That doesn’t mean don’t flex on the details, or don’t change priorities as market conditions change, but it does mean providing a consistent voice that shines through the clutter and confusion of all the details, questions and opinions that inevitably arise as the feature/enhancement/story gets closer to delivery.

It also means making sure that your “voice of the customer” is actually informed by the customer, so as you’re developing definition of Done, mockups, prototypes and alpha/beta versions, I’ve made a point of taking the opportunity where it exists to pull in a customer or three for a usability test, or a customer proxy (TSE, consultant, success advocate) to give me their feedback, reaction and thinking in response to whatever deliverables we have available.

The most important part of putting in this effort to listen, though, is learning and adapting to the feedback.  It doesn’t mean rip-sawing in response to any contrary input, but it does mean absorbing it and making sure you’re not being pig-headed about the up-front ideas you generated that are more than likely wrong in small or big ways.  One of my colleagues has articulated this as Presumptive Design, whereby your up-front presumptions are going to be wrong, and the best thing you can do is to put those ideas in front of customers, users, proxies as fast and frequently as possible to find out how wrong you are.

Evaluating Success

Up front and along the way, I develop a sense of what success will look like when it’s out there, and that usually takes the form of quantity and quality – useage of the feature, and satisfaction with the feature.  Getting instrumentation of the feature in place is a brilliant but low-fidelity way of understanding whether it was deemed useful – if numbers and ratios are high in the first week and then steadily drop off the longer folks use it, that’s a signal to investigate more deeply.  The user satisfaction side – post-hoc surveys, customer calls – to get a sense of NPS-like confidence and “recommendability” are higher-fidelity means of validating how it’s actually impacting real humans.

Advertisements

Occupied Neurons, November edition (late)

Docker In Production: a History of Failure

A cautionary tale to counter some of the newbie hype around the new Infrastructure Jesus that is Docker. I’ve fallen prey to the hype as well, assuming that (a)Docker is ready for prime time, (b) Docker is universally beneficial for all workloads and (c) Docker is measurably superior to the infrastructure design patterns that it intends to replace.

That said, the article is long on complaints, and doesn’t attempt to back its claims with data, third-party verification or unemotional hyperbole. I’m sure we’ll see many counter-articles claiming “it works for me”, “I never saw these kinds of problems” and “what’s this guy’s agenda?”  I’ll still pay attention to commentary like this, because it reads to me like the brain dump of a person exhausted from chasing their tail all year trying to find a tech combo that they can just put in production and not devote unwarranted levels of monitoring and maintenance to. I think their expectations aren’t unreasonable. It sure sounds like the Docker team are more ambitious or cavalier than their position and staffing levels warrant.

Wat

This is one of the most hilarious and horrifying expeditions into the dark corners of (un?)intended consequences in coding languages.  Watching this made me feel like I’m more versed in the lessons of the absurd “stupid pet tricks” with many languages, even if I’d never use 99% of these in real life.  It also made me feel like “did someone deliberately allow these in the language design, or did some nearly-insane persons just end up naturally stumbling on these while trying to make the language do things it should never have done?”

Is Agile dying a slow death?  Or is it being reborn?

This guy captures all my attitudes about “Agile according to the rules” versus “getting an organization tuned to collaborate and learn as fast as possible”.  While extra/unnecessary process makes us feel like we have guard rails to keep people from making mistakes, in my experience what it *actually* does it drive DISengagement and risk aversion in most employees, knowing that unless they have explicit permission to break the rules, their great new idea is likely to attract organizational antibodies.

Stanford’s password policy shuns one-size-fits-all security

This is better than a Bigfoot sighting! An actual organization who’ve thought about security risk vs punishing anti-usability and come up with an approach that should satisfy both campaigns! This UX-in-security bigot can finally die a happy man.

A famed hacker is grading thousands of programs – and may revolutionise software in the process

May not get to the really grotty code security issues that are biting us some days, and probably giving a few CIOs a false sense of security.  Controversial?  Yes.

A necessary next step as software grows up as an engineering discipline? Absolutely.

Let’s see many more security geeks meeting the software developer where they live, and stop expecting em to voluntarily become part-time security experts just because someone came up with another terrific Hollywood Security Theater plot.

A Rebuttal for Python 3

Why are some old-school Pythonistas so damned pissy about Python 3 – to the point of (in at least one egregiously dishonest case) writing long articles trying to dissuade others from using it? Are they still butthurt at Guido for making breaking changes that don’t allow them to run their old Python 2 code on the Python 3 runtime? Do they not like change? Are they aware that humans are imperfect and sometimes have to admit mistakes/try something different? I find it fascinating to watch these kinds of holy wars – it gives the best kinds of insights into what frailties and hot buttons really motivate people.

The best quote’s in the comments: “Wow, I haven’t seen this much bullshit in a “technical” article in a while. A Donald Trump transcript is more honest and informative than that. I seriously doubt Zed Shaw himself believes a single paragraph there; if he actually does, he should stop acting like a Python expert and admit he’s an idiot.”

How The Web Became Unreadable

It’s painful to see some designers slavishly devote their efforts more to the third hand fashion they hear about from other designers, than to the end users of the sites and services to which they deliver their designs. I love a lot of the design work that’s come out the last few years – the jumbled mess that was web design ten years ago was painful – but the practical implications of how that design is consumed in the wild must be paramount.  And it is where I am the final decision maker on shipping software.

Occupied Neurons, October edition

Melinda Gates Asked For Ideas to Help Women in Tech: Here They Are

https://backchannel.com/an-open-letter-to-melinda-gates-7c40d8696b63#
I am psyched that a powerhouse like Gates is taking up the cause, and I sincerely hope she reads this (and many other) articles to get a sense of the breadth of the problem (and how few working solutions there are).  The overlap with race, the attempts to bring more women into classrooms, the tech industry bias towards the elite schools and companies (and not the wealth of other experiences). It’s a target-rich environment to solve.

Building a Psychologically Safe Workplace: Amy Edmondson at TEDxHGSE

https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=LhoLuui9gX8

I am super-pleased to see that the concept of Psychological Safety is gaining traction in the circles and organizations I’m hanging with these days.  I spend an inordinate amount of time in my work making sure that my teammates and colleagues feel like it’s OK to make a mistake, to own up to dead ends and unknowns, and will sure make the work easier when I’m not the only one fighting the tide of mistrust/worry/fear that creates an environment where learning/risks/mistakes are being discouraged.

Three Books That Influenced CorgiBytes Culture

http://corgibytes.com/blog/2016/09/15/three-influential-books/

Andrea and Scott are two people who have profoundly changed my outlook on what’s possible to bring to the workplace, and how to make a workplace that truly fits what you want (and sometimes need) it to be. Talking about empathy as a first-class citizen, bringing actual balance to the day and the communications, and treating your co-workers better than we treat ourselves – and doing it in a fun line of business with real, deep impact for individual customers.

This is the kind of organization that I could see myself in. And which would draw in the kinds of people I enjoy working with each day.

So after meeting them earlier this year in Portland, I’ve followed their adventures via their blog and twitter accounts. This article is another nuanced look at what has shaped their workplace, and I sincerely hope I can do likewise someday.

Reducing Visual Noise for a Better User Experience

https://medium.com/@alitorbati/reducing-visual-noise-for-a-better-user-experience-ae3407ff9c99

View story at Medium.com

These days I find myself apprehensively clicking on Design articles on Medium.  While there’s great design thinking being discussed out there, I seem to be a magnet for finding the ones that complain why users/managers/businesses don’t “get it”.

As I’d hoped, this was an honest and detailed discussion of the inevitable design overload that creeps into most “living products”, and the factors that drove them to improve the impact for non-expert users.

(I am personally most interested in improving the non-expert users’ experience – experts and enthusiasts will always figure out a way to make shit work, even if they don’t like having to beat down a new door; the folks I care to feed are those who don’t have the energy/time/inclination/personality for figuring out something that should be obvious but isn’t.  Give me affordances, not a learning experience e.g. when you’ve got clickable/tappable controls on your page, give me lines/shadows/shading to signify “this isn’t just text”, not just subtle whitespace that cues the well-trained UI designer that there’s a button around that otherwise-identically-styled text.

Occupied Neurons, late May 2016

Understanding Your New Google Analytics Options – Business 2 Community

Here’s where the performance analytics and “business analytics” companies need to keep an eye or two over their shoulder. This sounds like a serious play for the high-margin customers – a big capital “T” on your SWOT analysis, if you’re one of the incumbents Google’s threatening.

10 Revealing Interview Questions from Product Management Executives

Prep’ing for a PM/PO job interview? Here’s some thought-provoking questions you should think about ahead of time.

When To Decline A Job Offer

The hardest part of a job search (at least for me) is trying to imagine how I would walk away from a job offer, even if it didn’t suit my needs, career aspirations. Beyond the obvious red flags (dark/frantic mood around the office, terrible personality fit with the team/boss), it feels ungrateful to say “no” based on a gut feel or “there’s something better”. Here’s a few perspectives to bolster your self-worth algorithm.

The Golden Ratio: Design’s Biggest Myth

I’m one of the many who fell for this little mental sleight-of-hand. Sounds great, right? A magic proportion that will make any design look “perfect” without being obvious, and will help elevate your designs to the ranks of all the other design geeks who must also be using the golden ratio.

Except it’s crap, as much a fiction and a force-fit as vaccines and autism or oat bran and heart disease (remember that old saw?). Read the well-researched discussion.

Agile Is Dead

This well-meaning dude fundamentally misunderstands Agile and is yet so expert that he knows how to improve on it. “Shuffling Trello cards” and “shipping often” doesn’t even begin…

Not even convinced *he* has read the Manifesto. Gradle is great, CD is great, but if you have no strategy for Release Management or you’re so deep in the bowels of a Microservices forest that you don’t have to worry about Forestry Management, then I’d prefer you step back and don’t confuse those chainsaw-wielders who I’m trying to keep from cutting off their limbs (heh, this has been brought to you by the Tortured Analogies Department).

Meetups where you’ll find Mike’s hat, Spring 2016 edition

Occasionally I’ll tell people I meet about all the meetups I have so much fun at.

Or rather, I’ll try to enumerate them all, and fail each and every time.

Primarily because there’s so many meetups I like to check in on.

So occasionally I’ll enumerate them like this, so that my friends have a valiant hope of crossing paths with me before the amazing event has passed.

Meetups I’m slavishly devoted to

Meetups I’ll attend anytime they’re alive

Meetups I sample like caviar – occasionally and cautiously

Recent additions that may soon pass the test of my time

 

You Get Invited When You Add Believable Value

I’m constantly amazed and amused at this kind of “but *I* deserve to be invited too” thinking:
All too often folks don’t want to bring everyone in on Day 1.
And that’s the real problem.
They don’t want to relinquish the (illusion of) control. They want the freedom to make many of the decisions without participating in this crucial collaborative work. Well, guess what? That’s a very costly move: The later everyone is brought in the greater the overall project risk.
In my career, I’ve heard this from the Operations folks, the Support team, the Security high priests, and most recently from the UX zealots.
This usually takes the form of “but if only they’d included us too in the conversation at the beginning, we wouldn’t be in this mess” fantasy.  The longer I watch these folks argue from the sidelines [and one of the things I used to do], the less sympathy I feel.
Telling us on the development & delivery side of the organization that we need to include you too feels a little like telling a kid they have to watch all the good movies with their parents in the room.  I’m sorry, what exactly about that sounds like an incentive?
“Oh, well if you found that security flaw in architecture instead of during test, it would’ve been orders of magnitude cheaper.”  As if it’s a pure win-win scenario – and not, as reality suggests from talking to the folks actually doing the real work, that rather than *prevent* every statistical possibility, often times we’d rather get the product out in front of people and find out which things *actually* bit them/us on the butt, and only spend time fixing *those* things.  Get product out there capturing revenue months earlier, plus reduce your investment on the long tail of an infinite number of possible issues that would cost schedule and profits to fix up front (and turn out to be non-issues)?  Yeah, you don’t need an MBA to make that kind of call.
[Not to mention, “fixing something in architecture is cheaper” assumes (1) that the architecture is communicated, interpreted and implemented carefully and successfully, (2) that new bugs aren’t introduced at every translation layer because the architects abandon their responsibility to follow-through, and (3) that they anticipated and addressed every implementation issue.]
“But if you just invited the UX designers/researchers before starting to talk about product features and ideas, you’ll have a much wider palette of well-designed ideas to work from.”  Yes, that’s potentially true – if your designers have a clear idea what the target users need – or if the researchers can turn around actionable findings in a short timeframe – or your UX bigots don’t throw cold water on every speculative idea and colour the conversation with “how crappy everyone but me is”.  That dude is real fun at parties.
We love working with that guy
Are you one of these people I’m picking on?  Are you sufficiently pissed off yet?  OK, good – then we’re getting close to a defensive wound we’re all still harbouring.  Which is the right time to clarify: I absolutely appreciate working with folks who are aligned to our business priorities, and work to get us actionable results in a timely manner that are relevant to the business problem we’re facing.  I’ve spent decades now working with security and usability geeks, and some I’ve found to be extremely helpful.  Some I’ve found less so.  Guess which ones I’ve heard complain like this?
Here’s the pitch from a Product Manager to everyone who’s vying to get a seat at the table: I don’t have enough room at the table to entertain everyone’s ego.  You ever try to drive an effective decision-making body when the room (or conference bridge) is stuffed so bad, it looks like a clown car?
It's a fun ride until you can't breathe
It’s a fun ride until you can’t breathe
Those who I invite to the table are effective collaborators.  If you have a concern, make sure it’s the most important thing on your plate, make sure it’s something I can understand, and make damn sure it’s something that’s going to have an impact on our business results.  Every time you spend your precious ante on “but what if…” and not “here’s a problem and here are all the possible/feasible/useful solutions, depending on your priorities”, your invitation to the next conversation fades like Marty McFly’s family in that photo.
McFly-Erasedfromexistance

How I do UX, partial thoughts: the no bullshit edition

Don’t expect a masters treatise, much in the way of theory, or anything resembling proof that UX Is Right.

Rose_PricklesI’m not interested in changing minds right here, or finding out if you’re a design bigot.  (I already know.) 

I’m also not going to pretend I’m something I’m not.  I’m not going to use a lot of flowery language, cryptic metaphor or industry jargon.  It is what it is.  A rose is a rose.

The important thing for me right here and now is to spell out what I do when I’m applying user experience principles to the stuff I create.  If you look closely, you’ll notice the topics are ordered according to where I spent most of my energy and attention. 

Interaction Design: identify what tasks a user needs to accomplish, understand why they need to accomplish it one way and not the others, and figure out how to provide an obvious/efficient/effective path through the software to successfully complete the task. 

Usability Engineering: identify the trouble spots, understand why that causes problems for people, and figure out how to make it better.

User Research: listen, ask questions, observe, ask more questions, offer unfinished ideas for early feedback, and thank them for their time and input. 

Information Architecture: spell words properly, choose words that users are familiar with, don’t use more words than you need to. 

Visual Design: choose colours that aren’t too garish, use colours and fonts consistently throughout the application(s), make sure things are aligned, don’t make users hunt for the affordances and cues.

See me speak at PDMA on UX for Product Managers (May 15th)

By the way, this Thursday I’ll be joining a panel of UX geeks talking at the Product Managers Association of Portland on “User Experience – What’s the Big Deal?”  I’m going in as the resident hybrid – UX geek and Product Owner, giving me the superpower to empathize with both halves of my brain when I do a crappy job for each of them. 🙂

Here’s a twist: I finally found a use for those “view this email in a browser”, because for some reason the PDMA doesn’t have a URL-able web page describing the logistics for this event:

http://us8.campaign-archive1.com/?u=f58583aa4a84e349713216644&id=464a80ea15&e=81024300cd

Hey, it’s a low-cost gathering of PO’s and PM’s getting together at the Lucky Lab for beer, food and some interesting conversation.  How bad could it be?

Image

 

Where to find Mike, March-ish edition

Did you catch my CHIFOO talk last week? Packed house, enrapt audience, 100 full-colour, annotated comics pages to enlighten and entertain. I’m told I was on fire, and I’m thinking hard on whether and where to re deliver this gem (I’ve already accepted one invitation). Let me know if you’d be interested.

Great Storytelling UX in Modern Comics
Slightly altered photo  of me at the event

Th. March 13th: PDX Web & Design “Unconference” – I’m gonna see if they take the bait on my three-minute “tell me my tool chain sucks and how yours is better” interactive discussion. Best way to goad them into teaching me something. [Update: it worked like a charm. I learned a ton in five minutes and loved the generosity of the audience.]

Tu. March 25th: IxDA PDX “Interaction Design Conference Redux” – will I feel as awkward at this group as ever? Only time will tell.

Th. March 27th: PDMA “UX – What’s the Big Deal?” (Don’t ask me where to find this event – apparently I’ve fallen into a secret society, what with both their chapter page and the LinkedIn group locked behind members-only walls. I’ll gladly teach you the friggin handshake for a beer.)

Sa. Mar 29th: BarCamp Portland – maybe I’ll be there and maybe you will too, if they pull off the radically hacked plan and haven’t all committed suicide.

20140313-215449.jpg
Batman says

Brain-wringing meetups and my upcoming CHIFOO talk on UX of Comics

I’m getting rather excited about my upcoming talk at CHIFOO on Great Storytelling UX in Modern Comic Books.  Over the next few weeks I’ll be finalizing the content and doing a few dry runs to smooth out the kinks and ensure I’m connecting with the audience at each page that I show during the presentation.  If you have the time and interest in seeing where this is headed, or helping out a guy make sure he’s making best use of the audience’s time, gimme a jangle.

Hawkblock

I’ve been out to a few meetups already this year (JavaScript Admirers, CHIFOO, STC) and helped out my poor dog who had a severe glaucoma attack and had to have an eye removed.  She’s bounced back amazingly and doesn’t seem to know that she’s not supposed to be missing an eye, which is a helluva lesson in staying present and adapting to change in this world. (Who knew my dog was a Buddhist?)

cyclops

Where will you find me in the next couple of weeks?

Further out I’m planning on BarCamp Portland 8 and ProductCamp Portland 2014.  Should be a brain-wringer.