When will DevSecOps resemble DevOps?

https://www-forbes-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.forbes.com/sites/jasonbloomberg/2017/11/20/mitigate-digital-transformation-cybersecurity-risk-with-devsecops/amp/

Another substance-free treatise on the glories of DevSecOps.

“Security is everyone’s job”, “everyone should care about security” and “we can’t just automate this job” seems to be the standard mantra, a decade on.

Which is entirely frustrating to those of us who are tired of security people pointing out the problems and then running as soon as there’s talk of the backbreaking labour of actually fixing the security issues, let alone making substantive system improvements that reduce their frequency in the future.

Hell, we even get a subheading that implies it’ll advance security goals in a CI/CD world: “The Role of Tooling in DevSecOps”. Except that there’s nothing more than a passing wave hello to Coverity (a decent static analysis vendor, but not the start nor the finish of the problem space) and more talk of people & process.

Where’s the leading thinkers on secure configuration of your containers? Where’s the automated injection of tools that can enforce good security IAM and correct for the bad?

I am very tired of chasing Lucy’s football:

lucy-football

I’m tired of going out to DevSecOps discussions at meetups and conferences and hearing nothing that sounds like they “get” DevOps.

DevOps works in service of the customers, developers and the business in helping to streamline, reduce the friction of release and make it possible to get small chances out as fast and frequently as possible.

I’ve asked at each of those discussions, “What tools and automation can you recommend that gets security integrated into the CI/CD chain?”

And I’ve heard a number of unsatisfying answers, from “security is everyone’s job and they should be considering it before their code gets committed” all the way through to “we can’t talk about tools until we get the culture right”. Which are all just tap-dancing dodges around the basic principle: the emperor has no clothes.

If DevSecOps is nothing more than “fobbing the job off on developers” and “we don’t recommend or implement any tools in the CI/CD chain”, then you have no business jumping on the DevOps bandwagon as if you’re actively participating in the process.

If you’re reliant merely on the humans (not the technology) to improve security, and further that you’re pushing the problem onto the people *least* expert in the problem space, how can you possibly expect to help the business *accelerate* their results?

Yes I get that DevOps is more than merely tools, but if you believe Gene Kim (as I’m willing to do), it’s about three principles for which tools are an essential component:

  1. Flow (reduce the friction of delivery) and systems thinking (not kicking the can down to some other poor soul)
  2. Amplify feedback loops (make it easy and obvious to learn from mistakes)
  3. Create a culture of learning from failure.

Now, which of those does your infosec approach support?

Hell, tell me I’m wrong and you’ve got a stack of tooling integrated into your DevOps pipeline. Tell me what kinds of tools/scripts/immutable infrastructure you’ve got in that stack. I will kiss your feet to find out what the rest of us are missing!

Edit: thoughts

  • Obviously I’m glossing over some basic tools everyone should be using: linters.  Not that your out-of-the-box linter is going to directly catch any significant security issues, no – but that if you don’t even have your code following good coding standards, how the hell will your senior developers have the attention and stamina to perform high-quality, rapid code reviews when they’re getting distracted by off-pattern code constructions?
  • Further, all decent linters will accept custom rules, disabled/info-only settings to existing rules – giving you the ability to converge on an accepted baseline that all developers can agree to follow, and then slowly expand the footprint of those rules as the obvious issues get taken care of in early rounds.
  • Oh, and I stumbled across the DevSecCon series, where there are likely a number of tantalizing tidbits

Edit: found one!

Here’s a CI-friendly tool: Peach API Security

  • Good news: built to integrate directly into the DevOps CI pipeline, testing the OWASP Top Ten against your API.
  • Bad news: I’d love to report something good about it, but the evaluation experience is frustratingly disjointed and incomplete.  I’m guessing they don’t have a Product Manager on the job, because there are a lot of missing pieces in the sales-evaluation-and-adoption pipeline:
    • Product Details are hosted in a PDF file (rather than online, as is customary today), linked as “How to Download” but titled “How to Purchase”
    • Most “hyperlinks” in the PDF are non-functional
    • Confusing user flow to get to additional info – “Learn More” next to “How to Download” leads to a Data Sheet, the footer includes a generic “Datasheets” link that leads to a jumbled mass over overly-whitespaced links to additional documents on everything from “competitive cheatsheets” to “(randomly-selected-)industry-specific discussion” to “list of available test modules”
    • Documents have no common look-and-feel, layout, topic flow or art/branding identity (almost as if they’re generated by individuals who have no central coordination)
    • There are no browseable/downloadable evaluation guides to explain how the product works, how to configure it, what commands to use to integrate it into the various CI pipelines, how to read the output, example scripts to parse and alert on the output – lacking this, I can’t gain confidence that this tool is ready for production usage
    • No running/interrogable sample by which to observe the live behaviour (e.g. an AWS instance running against a series of APIs, whose code is hosted in public GitHub repos)
  • I know the guys at Deja Vu are better than this – their security consulting services are awesome – so I’m mystified why Peach Tech seems the forgotten stepchild.

Edit: found another!

Neuvector is fielding a “continuous container security” commercial tool.  This article is what tipped me off about them, and it happens to mention a couple of non-commercial ideas for container security that are worth checking out as well:

Edit: and an open source tool!

Zed Attack Proxy (ZAProxy), coordinated by OWASP, and hosted on github.  Many automatable, scripted capabilities to search for security vulnerabilities in your web applications.

 

 

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