Occupied Neurons, November edition (late)

Docker In Production: a History of Failure

A cautionary tale to counter some of the newbie hype around the new Infrastructure Jesus that is Docker. I’ve fallen prey to the hype as well, assuming that (a)Docker is ready for prime time, (b) Docker is universally beneficial for all workloads and (c) Docker is measurably superior to the infrastructure design patterns that it intends to replace.

That said, the article is long on complaints, and doesn’t attempt to back its claims with data, third-party verification or unemotional hyperbole. I’m sure we’ll see many counter-articles claiming “it works for me”, “I never saw these kinds of problems” and “what’s this guy’s agenda?”  I’ll still pay attention to commentary like this, because it reads to me like the brain dump of a person exhausted from chasing their tail all year trying to find a tech combo that they can just put in production and not devote unwarranted levels of monitoring and maintenance to. I think their expectations aren’t unreasonable. It sure sounds like the Docker team are more ambitious or cavalier than their position and staffing levels warrant.

Wat

This is one of the most hilarious and horrifying expeditions into the dark corners of (un?)intended consequences in coding languages.  Watching this made me feel like I’m more versed in the lessons of the absurd “stupid pet tricks” with many languages, even if I’d never use 99% of these in real life.  It also made me feel like “did someone deliberately allow these in the language design, or did some nearly-insane persons just end up naturally stumbling on these while trying to make the language do things it should never have done?”

Is Agile dying a slow death?  Or is it being reborn?

This guy captures all my attitudes about “Agile according to the rules” versus “getting an organization tuned to collaborate and learn as fast as possible”.  While extra/unnecessary process makes us feel like we have guard rails to keep people from making mistakes, in my experience what it *actually* does it drive DISengagement and risk aversion in most employees, knowing that unless they have explicit permission to break the rules, their great new idea is likely to attract organizational antibodies.

Stanford’s password policy shuns one-size-fits-all security

This is better than a Bigfoot sighting! An actual organization who’ve thought about security risk vs punishing anti-usability and come up with an approach that should satisfy both campaigns! This UX-in-security bigot can finally die a happy man.

A famed hacker is grading thousands of programs – and may revolutionise software in the process

May not get to the really grotty code security issues that are biting us some days, and probably giving a few CIOs a false sense of security.  Controversial?  Yes.

A necessary next step as software grows up as an engineering discipline? Absolutely.

Let’s see many more security geeks meeting the software developer where they live, and stop expecting em to voluntarily become part-time security experts just because someone came up with another terrific Hollywood Security Theater plot.

A Rebuttal for Python 3

Why are some old-school Pythonistas so damned pissy about Python 3 – to the point of (in at least one egregiously dishonest case) writing long articles trying to dissuade others from using it? Are they still butthurt at Guido for making breaking changes that don’t allow them to run their old Python 2 code on the Python 3 runtime? Do they not like change? Are they aware that humans are imperfect and sometimes have to admit mistakes/try something different? I find it fascinating to watch these kinds of holy wars – it gives the best kinds of insights into what frailties and hot buttons really motivate people.

The best quote’s in the comments: “Wow, I haven’t seen this much bullshit in a “technical” article in a while. A Donald Trump transcript is more honest and informative than that. I seriously doubt Zed Shaw himself believes a single paragraph there; if he actually does, he should stop acting like a Python expert and admit he’s an idiot.”

How The Web Became Unreadable

It’s painful to see some designers slavishly devote their efforts more to the third hand fashion they hear about from other designers, than to the end users of the sites and services to which they deliver their designs. I love a lot of the design work that’s come out the last few years – the jumbled mess that was web design ten years ago was painful – but the practical implications of how that design is consumed in the wild must be paramount.  And it is where I am the final decision maker on shipping software.

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